An on-line guestbook: Memories of Susan Blake

January 1, 2008 at 5:16 pm 5 comments

By adding a comment to this post, you can share your reflections on the life of Susan June Blake.

From: Miriam Goodman, Huntington

Over 30 years ago, when I became interested in being active in the fight against the Shoreham nuclear power plant because of my concerns about radiation, an acquaintance steered me to Susan Blake and the Friday night Peacesmiths forum. Susan put me in touch with anti-nuclear activists in Great Neck who were instrumental in the formation of the then fairly new North Shore Coalition for Safe Energy, an organization which I joined and co-chaired for a number of years.

Susan was one of the early activists in the Shoreham opposition, having formed the Peacesmiths Energy Project and was an important coordinator for the Long Island Safe Energy Coalition (LISEC). I distinctly remember an all-day conference on nuclear power organized by Susan, as well as LISEC’s newsletter, CHAIN REACTION, to which Susan contributed. She was pleased recently to receive several issues of that newsletter still in my possession. Susan’s efforts always involved working cooperatively with all groups opposed to Shoreham island-wide.

In those days, it always amazed me that Susan, who was so much younger than I (she was in her twenties), was so politically astute, both in relation to issues as well as to people and their interactions. In that respect, I could learn from her. And she, in turn, never hesitated to call on me when she wanted me to share information on radiation. She, of course, was totally dedicated and never put a limit on the number of issues she deemed important enough to warrant action. Even while she was ill, she insisted on joining me in organizing a commemorative evening of film and discussion on the 25th anniversary of the Three Mile Island nuclear accident.

Susan had a vision of establishing a PeaceSmiths Social Change Library. It would be a great tribute to her if this could become a reality.

(Comments previously posted at the wilderside web-site)

From: Hank Stone on October 4, 2007 at 5:30 pm

I first met Susan about 2 years ago. I had called about attending the Peacesmiths monthly musical event and open mic. She asked me if I would like to be the featured performer, to fill in for a cancellation. I accepted, and got there early to help set up. After many trips down to the basement and up, with chairs, tables, pillows, candles, etc., I was quite winded. Susan kept on at a much faster pace, although I knew she had health problems. While I took it easy to prepare for my performance, she kept on moving all night, as organizer and hostess.
From Susan I learned that compassionate concern for this world can be a righteous source of energy. I last saw her on a beautiful day, at the bluegrass festival, with her bicycle. Namaste, Susan.

*
From: alan wasserman on October 5, 2007 at 8:21 pm

I joined peacesmiths in 1989 we were involved with central american and the domestic homeless issue. I had been living in a building in freeport for some time they converted this building into a co-op by the late 80s and i was one of the last remaining original tenants left. during this co-op conversion the managment would do heavy constuction renovations inside of the apartments.But this work started to disturb other living things in the building by no time we had a major cock roach problem in every part of the building,but instead of at least hiring a licensed pest control company to take care
of the problem the management started to take the easy way out by buying pestisides themselves that were designed to attack the nervous systems of insects and animals and they were saturating the building with this dangerous poison without following proper labeling directions the building was turning into a gas chamber so it seemed to me that the management was creating a more dangerous situation then originally existed, i had to organize both tenants and owners to stop the illegal and excessive abuse of pestisides in our building.Well i really didnot know how to properly organize a protest like this so i went to susan blake and she told me about the different county and state agencies to go to for help, she advised me about my rights as a tenant , i whanted to make up a petition that all of the tenants and owners who were interested in stopping this madness could sign to present to the management and the health department but i never did anything like this before so susan wrote the petition this battle to stop the spraying went on for sometime and then in 1991 susan myself and some progressive owners got together and we raised money in the building to have a licensed exterminator who only used non toxic methods to deal with roach problems , some owners were inpressed but the illegal spraying by the managment continued i was in contact with susan every day she never gave up or let me down, i was also in constant contact with the nassau county health department and D.E.C. as per susans advise finally we both had a special investigations state police unit of the D.E.C. come down to the building they started an investigation that found the building super who was under the control of the management guilty of using pestisides in a place other then his own home without a license these pestisides were made to be used in chicken coops and barns not around people,this horrible fight lasted for almost ten years by the time it was over we were into the late 1990s it almost killed me i could not have kept going or won this fight without susan we were on the phone together every day im still very greatful to her for that, so thats part of what susan blake was doing durring the 1990s helping me stop that stupid madness my god that fight did almost kill me it really did. Susan we have had our ups and downs over the years but i really do love you very much dont worry you will be with your mother and father and patty god speed to you dear friend i will meet you again on the other side we will always be good friends dont worry about it i love you very much.
alan wasserman
*
From: Sue Kaye on October 6, 2007 at 9:00 pm ·

For Susan Blake

The first time I every met you was back in September 1995 at the Folk Dance. I will always remember you dancing your favorite dance. I cannot spell the name of it but starts with the letter C.

At the Coffeehouse always runing around making sure everything was just right.

Your name will be in memory on my back at all the breast cancer race I do. Your name will be added to the list of women this makes number 10 names in memory of.

*
From: Gior on October 8, 2007 at 1:47 am

I remember when I first met Susan some 20 odd years ago. She lived behind my bakery and always came in for croissants. She was invariably colorfully dressed with her trusty bicycle. I have a picture of her in front of the store on her bike along with Barry. They serendipitously ran into each other there that day after several years and retold the story of how Susan saved Barry from drowning many years before.

I loved when Susan would come by my house in the evenings and we’d have dinner together in my sunroom, candles on the table …… the crickets chirping outside…classical music softly playing in the background. But the best thing was our conversations. Susan was brilliant…. a wonderful conversationalist and a fabulous debater. Sometimes we’d disagree vehemently and other times we’d laugh….we even gossiped some.

She was afraid of dogs but when she saw how gentle and well behaved my dogs were, she relaxed and even enjoyed them.

I remember that distinctive smell that was quintessential Susan….Dr. Bonner’s Peppermint soap!

She’d call me when she needed something artistic. One night she came by and we worked on a flyer using my computer….that was in the days when she hated using computers for anything. So we sat up all night long because everything that was written had to be redone and looked at in every kind of font possible! Not bad for someone who didn’t like computers!

We’d often get tired after talking for hours and Susan would end up spending the night on the sofa. Just a few weeks ago Susan called….she was feeling uncomfortable and hot and asked if she could come over. Of course! It was the first time she actually allowed me to pick her up and drive her home the following morning. We watched a tape of her play that night.

Susan gave me a gift before she died that I will always remember and she helped me in an hour of need when she herself was in so much need. That is real love and caring. She also gave me the gift of meeting wonderful people.

I don’t feel like she is gone yet. I guess it’s denial. But I will miss all those things we did together and her wonderful Peacesmith’s coffeehouse events….presented as only Susan could do. Sometimes….tired as I was…I’d stay afterwards to wash the dishes and help her pack things away until the next coffeehouse.

I will miss our late night phone calls. I will miss running into Susan at the supermarket or riding her bike around town. I will miss her scintillating conversation, her smile, her humor. The world will miss an avid activist who lived by her creed.

Someone very special is now gone and my life will be changed because of the loss. This makes me very sad.

Susan, wherever you are, I hope you finally found peace. It was an honor knowing you and having you as my friend. Thank you. Peace.
*

From: Jeanne Strole, A.J. Muste Memorial Institute on October 8, 2007 at 1:55 pm

I met Susan for the first time about 20 plus years ago. I was a junior in high school and she came to my class as a guest speaker. I started volunteering with Peacesmiths soon after and worked with Susan on the Coffeehouse, the monthly discussion forums and various other events on and off for the next several years.

As a teenager, walking into the old Peacesmiths basement office in Massapequa for the first time, going to my first coffeehouse upstairs in the living room of Katherine Smith’s house…..it was like a little slice from a different time. I learned a great deal from Susan and, by her example, she gave me the courage to live according to my beliefs.

I don’t have a third of her energy and only possess a fraction of her dogged determination, but I am continually inspired by her force of will and by the uncompromising way Susan lived her life every minute of every day.

I think that is what I will miss most about Susan; she would never, ever compromise her beliefs when it came to peace and social justice. If only there were more people in this country with the courage to stand by their beliefs, to stand by what they know in their hearts to be the truth….maybe things would have gone differently the last six years. Damn! I’m going to miss you, Susan. I promise to do the best work that I can in your memory.
*

From: Laura Pologe on December 11, 2007 at 9:36 pm

From our first meeting in the stairwell of Gannett freshman year at the University of Rochester, to children’s theater, to tree pants in Harriman Park, to porcupines in the Catskills, to years of woodwind quintets and flute and oboe duets, to peace marches, to Clearwater, to coffee houses, to picnics and Shakespeare in the Park, to hours of talking, to hours of laughing, to sadness and fragility and still great spirit. It was a real nice clambake. Dear Susan-I miss you.

*
From: Jay Williams on January 6, 2008 at 6:12 pm

susan will win. her heart was given over to peace, and her spirit will see the earth through to this. she was and is one of the many who are taking us through all the conflict, differences, and lack of vision, to the better world we are going to have. did she live to see it? this is like asking, susan, do you hear me now? the answer is yes– her spirit lives, she is still here, we will keep speaking her name. there is nothing stronger than a leader for peace. thank you susan for all the moments we shared.

From: Roger Silverberg on October 3, 2007 at 11:18 am

I think what you said about what Susan taught you rings very strongly; being a pacifist does not mean being passive. Susan was a true-to-life rallying cry against apathy. Of which, unfortunately, far too many members of my generation are proving themselves by their non-words and non-actions.
*
From: suzanne j zoubeck on October 3, 2007 at 2:58 pm

Mucho props for having this footage & posting this lovely tribute to Susan. I hadn’t cried yet about Susan being gone but while watching this footage…I lost it.

I was thinking how Susan should have been on a game show where they click off how many issues one can discuss in a finite period of time, also judged on content and quality of the statement. Count how many political and social justice issues Susan covered in this clip :) . She really is at the top of her game here.

Please make out a will and a health care proxy if you haven’t done so already as Susan did not (health care proxy she maybe had but I won’t swear to it)…no matter how little you have, it’s a good thing. If you can’t afford to do so, go to a law school and see if someone can do it pro bono.
*
From: Colleen Eren on October 3, 2007 at 4:08 pm

The world has lost one of its most vibrant, courageous, and loving souls, someone who fought eloquently and tirelessly for the greater good in spite of immense personal suffering and pain. Susan was a friend and mentor, a human being in every way inspirational. Although under a death sentence herself, she gave a damn about those on death row, and so much more. She will be missed greatly.
*
evelina kahn on October 3, 2007 at 6:42 pm

Thank you, Ian, for making this clip and your lovely words available; Susan has been a good friend of mine for years and I’m terribly sad to lose her presence. I don’t mind being repetitive in saying that she taught me so much by her exemplary indefatigable commitment, activism, and passion. She had an almost endless ability to take on new issues with the interest of a muckraker and the intensity of a hero. As one of the “token” Western trained practitioners on her health care team, I need to say that she handled her diagnosis with extraordinary courage and grace. I hope that she is at peace now.
*
Billy Thompson on October 4, 2007 at 7:55 am

Thank you so much for putting this up, I hadn’t seen it before…Susan taught me so many things about resistance and pacifism (including that it’s not nice to give the finger to people that yell at you on picket lines) She was always active, always doing something, always thinking about the movement, every single day, up till the end. This is a terrible loss, but her example inspires us…
*
Puthzel on October 5, 2007 at 4:52 am

Thanks for sharing that video…
Keep posting friends….

puthzel
Thanks…
*
richard chilton on October 5, 2007 at 11:31 am

Grace Paley and Susan June Blake

by richard chilton

The late Grace Paley, the celebrated short story writer, lived in Greenwich Village and Vermont, while the late Susan June Blake, founder of Peacesmiths House, a peace and justice, cultural center, lived in Amity, Long Island. Both were extraordinary gifted women who believed passionately in life, and in Humanity, and were active in neighborhoods and communities all over the greater New York metropolitan region and beyond. Both were artists, but gave even more to the disenfranchised and dispossessed than to personal ego. Both were irrepressible activists, who “worked” the streets tirelessly on scores of diverse but related concerns, from nuclear power to nuclear weapons, and on issues of race, gender and class. Both had breast cancer when the Iraq War began, yet they sustained if not increased their public presence, as if to say, “My body may go, but my spirit will live on” in the work of others, and of our shared belief as a People and species in how the world could be.

i was humbled to know both women. Each made a mark on those who knew them, who loved them, who knew about their work and their lives. We are all better for such women having lived among us. Thank you, Susan, and travel well on your journey.

richard chilton
Rosalie, Nebraska
*
wilderside on October 5, 2007 at 12:59 pm

Last night, Thursday/Friday at midnight, there was a tribute to Susan on WBAI. Bob Fass’s show-Radio Unnameable. The show is available to play on the wbai archives at: wbai.org. You click on “archives” and find the “Radio Unnameable” show for October 5th.

Also, I wanted to mention, that on the show, a few people referred to Susan as “pixie-like.” And, while it seems ironic to say about such a strong woman, such a fighter for peace and justice, there was something bright, energetic, and pixie-like about Susan’s spirit. And, I appreciate her friends for finding another word to describe her spirit.

With love,
Kimberly
*
Jeanne Strole on October 5, 2007 at 8:13 pm

Por nuestros Muertos y Desaparecidos, no un minuto de silencio. Todo unavida de lucha.

“For our dead and disappeared, not a moment of silence. Only a lifetime of struggle.”
*

Jeanne Strole on October 5, 2007 at 8:17 pm

You are not gone until you’re forgotten. :)

*
Mitchel Cohen on October 6, 2007 at 12:40 pm

Very strange. I was about to invite Susan to be on my internet radio show and was fumbling through my lists looking for her phone number when the notice came through that her breast cancer had spread to her liver, and she’d died.

Ohhhhhhh.

Long ago, Susan and I had many differences — she was (was? was? WAS?) a pacifist who obsessed on every little detail, and I was (and remain) much more open to all sorts of actions so long as they are clearly directed against the war criminals and mass murderers. Over the many years we knew and respected and sometimes disagreed with each other, it was only during her illness and in the WBAI battles (we were on the same side there) that we got to know each other a little better. Still, when she invited me to speak, read poems, etc. last year at one of the PeaceSmith events, she was nervous about what I was going to say, and called me several times (can you spell c-o-n-t-r-o-l, but lovingly) …. each time I assured her that I wasn’t going to advocate blowing up buildings. Susan had a sort of cartoon-caricature of me and others in the Red Balloon Collective from long ago. It culminated at a 1980 march on the Congress, if I remember my dates correctly, in which I and other members of the RBC joined her and other pacifists carrying a giant banner that read “If you need more energy, burn the bourgeoisie.” Susan strongly objected to those “violent” sentiments, and didn’t so much “ask” us but directed us to march with a different contingent. And then there was the time …. oh, but I digress ….

We came closer with her illness. I was very impressed that she — unlike so many other activists — chose to struggle with her cancer using alternative protocols, and rejected the dominant capitalist paradigm. That’s probably what enabled her to live 4x longer than the doctors had predicted — although I do have some questions for Dr. Schachter about his treatments. Having had health issues (heart) myself, and having, like Susan, rejected the pharmaceutical poisons they peddle as “treatments” in this society, I really appreciated and applauded Susan’s decision. I never understood how people who fight against the system in every other aspect of their lives then trust it and turn to it on matters of health care, life and death. On Susan’s recommendation, I even went to her acupuncturist, Dr. Feng Liang, who helped me greatly in some issues I was having. And then we both spoke on a panel last year (along with Bill McNulty) at the annual Be-In that Tim, Rob, Jessica and Erica organize out in Yaphank every August, and we had some interesting exchanges there.

Anyway, I originally wrote the following poem for Mumia Abu-Jamal and Leonard Peltier, but it seems apropos to read it again for Susan — who loved it the first time she heard it at the aforementioned PeaceSmith event where she asked me to “perform” (she was very surprised she liked it so much, and told me so. It’s fun, isn’t it, to learn that people have many layers and are not one-dimensional, no?) … I was also honored to read it at our friend and antiwar veteran David Cline’s funeral a few weeks ago, too. (All these dyings of friends in our antiwar Movement, I am reminded by the Clancy Brothers great song: “Let’s not have a sniffle, let’s have a bloody good cry / and always remember the longer your live / the sooner you’re going to die …” )

THE MACHINERY OF SLEEP TURNS ITS FIRST WHEEL

They took the owls
our wolves
our deer

They took our words
and sold
the rain

They took our corn
and coined
the pastures

They took our pictures
and stole
the spirit

They took our forests
and now gasp
for air

They paved our paths
running deserts
corrugated streams

They took our time
the long silence
between heartbeats

They took our shoes
still we are coming
our feet

Wrapped
in the skins
of dreams

– Mitchel Cohen
Red Balloon Poetry Conspiracy
*
Joan Payne Kincaid on October 6, 2007 at 1:14 pm

for susan blake

she was managing the affair
at my reading for her
a flashlight!

I remember now
on the telephone how tired
you said you were

I’ll miss you girl
bow in red curly hair
rose-cheek smile
such an early time
to leave

she is setting out
cookies and flyers
on the tables of heaven

joan payne kincaid

Love Mitch’s poem and thank him for referring me here.

*
*
Onbehalfof MaxWheat on October 6, 2007 at 2:21 pm

PeaceSmiths House:
Prelude to the Topical, A-Typical, Folk Music, Poetry and Whatever Coffeehouse

for Susan Blake

Winter evening
mugs of hot cider
guitar music glowing

“Puff the Magic Dragon lives by the sea. . .”

Hearth flames flickering
near sofa
where girl makes a cave under arm
of boy with red hair

“If I had a hammer. . .”

Young woman on frayed brown chair
cushions her man’s head
on long lavender dress

Black cherry log crackles

The professor, streaming fingers
through his wife’s graying black hair
looks up

“For all we know this may be only a dream. . .”

Maxwell Corydon Wheat, Jr. ©

*

Sue Kaye on October 6, 2007 at 8:46 pm

I will always remember you at the Coffeehouse every month making sure every thing was just right.

Sue

*
Eddie on October 6, 2007 at 9:39 pm

A great loss. Thank you for honoring her.

*
Onbehalfof PeterBerryman on October 7, 2007 at 7:11 am

…I am so sorry to hear of Susan’s death. It’s not getting any easier for me to accept the whole idea of death, even though we have lost so many of our friends recently…

Please accept my sincere condolences, and love.

Peter Berryman

*

Alice Rubien on October 7, 2007 at 12:56 pm

I never knew Susan Blake, the woman and activist, but I did know her as my daughter Janet’s best friend, a teenager in High School.

When I think of Susan, I will remember her as the youngster who always marched to a different drummer, (her drummer).

I see from the other tributes, she has taken her tune and used it to make a difference in the world around her. Bravo, Susan!!

Alice Rubien

*

Gior on October 8, 2007 at 1:30 am

I remember when I first met Susan some 20 odd years ago. She lived behind my bakery and always came in for croissants. She was invariably colorfully dressed with her trusty bicycle. I have a picture of her in front of the store on her bike along with Barry. They serendipitously ran into each other there that day after several years and retold the story of how Susan saved Barry from drowning many years before.

I loved when Susan would come by my house in the evenings and we’d have dinner together in my sunroom, candles on the table …… the crickets chirping outside…classical music softly playing in the background. But the best thing was our conversations. Susan was brilliant…. a wonderful conversationalist and a fabulous debater. Sometimes we’d disagree vehemently and other times we’d laugh….we even gossiped some.

She was afraid of dogs but when she saw how gentle and well behaved my dogs were, she relaxed and even enjoyed them.

I remember that distinctive smell that was quintessential Susan….Dr. Bonner’s Peppermint soap!

She’d call me when she needed something artistic. One night she came by and we worked on a flyer using my computer….that was in the days when she hated using computers for anything. So we sat up all night long because everything that was written had to be redone and looked at in every kind of font possible! Not bad for someone who didn’t like computers!

We’d often get tired after talking for hours and Susan would end up spending the night on the sofa. Just a few weeks ago Susan called….she was feeling uncomfortable and hot and asked if she could come over. Of course! It was the first time she actually allowed me to pick her up and drive her home the following morning. We watched a tape of her play that night.

Susan gave me a gift before she died that I will always remember and she helped me in an hour of need when she herself was in so much need. That is real love and caring. She also gave me the gift of meeting wonderful people.

I don’t feel like she is gone yet. I guess it’s denial. But I will miss all those things we did together and her wonderful Peacesmith’s coffeehouse events….presented as only Susan could do. Sometimes….tired as I was…I’d stay afterwards to wash the dishes and help her pack things away until the next coffeehouse.

I will miss our late night phone calls. I will miss running into Susan at the supermarket or riding her bike around town. I will miss her scintillating conversation, her smile, her humor. The world will miss an avid activist who lived by her creed.

Someone very special is now gone and my life will be changed because of the loss. This makes me very sad.

Susan, wherever you are, I hope you finally found peace. It was an honor knowing you and having you as my friend. Thank you. Peace.
*
Sharleen Leahey on October 24, 2007 at 9:03 am

I first met Susan a few short months ago last May when she booked me to perform at the PeaceSmiths Coffeehouse. I was immediately struck by her warmth and intense commitment to so many issues dear to my own heart. It’s not often I meet someone like Susan. It was shocking to learn about her passing through a message left by another friend. I had heard about PeaceSmiths form years and I am so thankful I got to meet the woman who was behind it. I will always cherish the memory of the night I spent making music and sharing time with Susan Blake, a woman of strength, passion and deep commitment to peace for all beings.
May peace prevail,
Sharleen Leahey
Songs for Peace

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5 Comments Add your own

  • 1. wilderside  |  January 14, 2008 at 9:35 pm

    From: Jeanne Strole on October 4, 2007 at 4:36 pm

    Thank you for this page dedicated to Susan. I agree that this is a terrible loss. Susan was an utterly tireless worker for peace and justice. She taught us so much about determination and courage in the face of dark times. She taught us about commitment and how to ignore despair, be her example, by continually throwing herself with love, humour, joy and seemingly limitless energy into the endless work of resistance. Susan, I will miss you. Thank you for teaching me and for never ceasing to prod me. If I have inherited even a fraction of your stubbornness, I will feel blessed. Fine journey……..

  • 2. mildred  |  January 17, 2008 at 5:16 pm

    I met Susan more than 20 years ago at a Peacesmith function. In the last fews years I would talk to her on the phone. Susan was a beautiful person. If more people had a spirit like Susan it would be a wonderful world. She always had a beautiful smile despite the fact her health was failing. Rest in peace. Love Mildred

  • 3. Premik dedicates a song to Lisa and Susan « PeaceSmiths  |  February 13, 2008 at 8:05 am

    […] To post your own reflections on the life of Susan June Blake, please visit: here. […]

  • 4. peacesmiths  |  February 13, 2008 at 6:15 pm

    Submitted via e-mail by Reverend Janice:

    I had the privilege of caring for Susan in what might have been the most difficult time of hers or anyone’s life, in the wilderness of last days, at dear friend Cindy’s home, visited by her sister, connecting as she could with us and a few friends. Susan and I allied from first phone communication, and bonded from first meeting in Dr Schachter’s office with commonalities and the interconnectedness of our lives. I feel like I knew her in person for only seconds; getting glimpses of her life thru a kaleidoscope, as it was then and how it was now – synopses juxtaposed to details of moment by moment existence. It was my joy to make and see her eat one of her last solid meals – a “perfect” onion & cheese omelet with her especially fresh, healthy eggs. It was my honor to follow the instructions from sentences weakening into breathy words in an attempt to ease her discomfort. It was inspiring to hear her modestly uncover threads of accomplishments and capabilities and to realize all the lives she affected/touched, and then to have that vastly expand while attending her life celebration. It was easy to rub her back during the last coffeehouse concert for which she summed up all her energy to attend. Three days later shortly after I returned home from Susan-care, it was a shock to my intuitive knowing to answer the call telling me Susan was gone. One an half after I left her, after I stroked her face and hair, sharing few words and much love; tearfully telling her I wish my sister Susan was like her as we exchanged “I love you;” a precious moment in time…

    When Susan attended the GoldenApple Coffeehouse I’m involved in, she heard one of my favorite performers, a sensitive songwriter and excellent musician. When he asked the audience for a response to a question, Susan was the solo voice answering with a surprisingly strong expression about procrastination! Susan, and all, loved the concert; we were thrilled that she did. Thereafter, I’ve never heard Fall Down as the Rain, one of my favorite Joe Crookston songs, without thinking Susan must have written it. If time had allowed, I would have played it at the celebration; I’m pleased to be able to offer it now in written form and with a link to hear part of it. This song gives us tangible ways to be reminded of Susan’s beautiful presence in the natural world.

    Thank you, Susan, for allowing me to care for and learn from you.

    Rev. Janice

    Excerpt from the song:

    JOE CROOKSTON: Fall Down as the Rain

    Fall Down as the Rain
    Joe Crookston 2004

    “When my life is over
    And I have gone away
    I’m gonna leave this big ole’ world
    And the trouble and the pain…”

  • 5. Janet Rubien  |  February 8, 2014 at 7:16 pm

    It’s been a few years now, but time will never diminish how my bff Susan change my life.

    Janet Rubien

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Calendar

***2017***

Fri. June 2
8pm
John Myles
Walter Sargent
PLUS
Open Time.
*
Fri, May 7
8pm
George Mann
PLUS
Open Mic
*
Fri. April 7
8pm
Ken "The Rocket" Korb
and Jesse Pagano (blues)
PLUS
Open Mic
*
Fri. March 3rd
8pm
PS Coffeehouse
Pete Mancini,
Gary Ivan,
Open Mic
**
Fri. Feb 3rd
8pm
PS Coffeehouse
Eli Maniscalco
and
Tom Ryan
**
January 2017
PS Coffeehouse
Jazz with Jimi Durso and
Billionaire Brian
**
December 2016
Fri. December 2, 2016
Keith Simmons; Beaumont Tamchin; and Andy Greenhouse
**
November 2016
Fri, November 4,, 2016
8pm
Bob Westcott and Dud Music
**

The PeaceSmiths Coffeehouse is the first Friday of the month, from October to June.

Public Access TV

PeaceSmiths Monthly Coffeehouse and Monthly Forum can sometimes be seen on Public Access TV on the Woodbury Cable system channel 20 on the following shows:

Church of Comedy

Harmony Rising

Banner Photo

The banner photo is PeaceSmiths friends and banner in Washington, D.C. for a peace march on January 27, 2007. Susan is waving on the left, above the "e". Photo copyright Merly Thinanyi of Thihanyi Photography in Valley Stream.


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